Sunday, September 28, 2014

Sautéed Cumin Swiss Chard & Kale

Post and recipe contributed by Katrina Kairys
Cumin is a wonderful spice. It’s always a staple ingredient in my chili, but it can add a richly warm and spicy aroma to simple vegetable dishes. Cumin is a great source of iron which is needed to keep our immune systems up to par, especially now that – okay, I’ll say it – winter is coming. Use cumin to spice up vitamic-C packed kale and vitamin-K packed Swiss chard and you’ve got yourself an elixir in a bowl. Swiss chard comes in many colours and there was a rainbow of chard at the McGill Farmers’ Market this week – purple, green, and yellow – but it doesn’t matter which you use for the recipe. I find that Swiss chard and kale go together nicely, but you could also prepare spinach or collard greens with this mix of spices. This “veggie hash” as I call it can be eaten as a side, or as a main dish topped with tofu, chicken, or another source of protein. I did the opposite and used it to top my scrambled eggs. You get the point. It’s a versatile dish that’s worth trying out.

Sautéed Cumin Swiss Chard & Kale


Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 25 minutes
2 tbsp olive oil
2 cups coarsely chopped Swiss chard
1 cup coarsely chopped kale
½ cup diced white onion
1 tsp Cumin
1 tsp Chili powder
1 ½ tsp dried oregano
 pinch of salt

Directions:
1. Heat olive oil on medium heat and add chopped onion.

2. Cover and cook for 10 minutes until transluscent white.

3. Turn up to medium-high and add Swiss chard and kale. Cook uncovered for 15 minutes, stirring every few minutes.



4. Turn heat to low and add cumin, oregano, chili powder, and salt. Mix well.  


Sautéed Cumin Swiss Chard and Kale atop 
Sweet-Potato Scrambled Eggs


"My interest in cooking began with a goal to eat healthy and use clean (and pronounceable) ingredients. After months of steamed veggies and chicken I got bored quickly. I started visiting Montreal's local markets and learned what a spice rack was. Montreal has turned me into foodie extraordinaire, and I now experiment with vegan, paleo, and gluten-free recipes that pack tons of flavour. Mind you, I'll add the occasional slice of butter or full-fat cheese to my recipes, but I'll warn you beforehand!" - Katrina

Sunday, September 21, 2014

The "Canuck" Waldorf Salad

A Waldorf salad with no celery or mayonnaise? Blasphemy! This take on the classic Waldorf salad developed in the 19th century at the Waldorf Hotel in New York City combines all things Canadian, from local produce to sweet maple sugar. I don’t typically go out of my way to find vegan versions of pre-made products, but I saw Spectrum Naturals Vegan Canola Mayonnaise on the grocery shelf and thought I’d do a taste test. It surprisingly tastes quite similar to the real thing, yet has much less sugar and saturated fat. I also stuck it in some paninis I made for guests, and they couldn't tell the difference! It's a great spread for sandwiches, but I thought it would easily make a rich-tasting salad dressing for a Waldorf salad. I stocked up on produce in every colour of the rainbow at the McGill Farmer’s Market: green peppers, carrots, cucumber, and of course, apples that were probably picked off the branch that morning in Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec (or at least I’d like to think so!).

"Canuck" Waldorf Salad
Prep time: 10 minutes
Assembly time: 10 minutes

1 cup chopped carrot
I cup chopped cucumber
1 cup chopped green bell pepper
1 medium-sized apple (I use McIntosh), chopped into pieces
1 tb raisins (and extra for garnish)
1 tb walnuts, coarsely chopped (and extra for garnish)
1 tb vegan eggless mayonnaise
1 tsp apple cider vinegar
½ tsp maple sugar (you can substitute any other type of sugar)
a pinch rosemary
a pinch cinnamon

Directions:
1. Combine chopped veggies, apple, raisins, and walnuts in a bowl.
Optional: I was in a rush to whip up a quick lunch, but if you have the extra 8-9 minutes, toast the walnuts in the oven beforehand to bring out their flavour.


2. In a small bowl mix mayonnaise, vinegar, maple sugar, rosemary, and cinnamon. Stir until combined.


3. Add the dressing and toss the salad.



4. Garnish with raisins and walnuts.


"My interest in cooking began with a goal to eat healthy and use clean (and pronounceable) ingredients. After months of steamed veggies and chicken I got bored quickly. I started visiting Montreal's local markets and learned what a spice rack was. Montreal has turned me into foodie extraordinaire, and I now experiment with vegan, paleo, and gluten-free recipes that pack tons of flavour. Mind you, I'll add the occasional slice of butter or full-fat cheese to my recipes, but I'll warn you beforehand!" - Katrina