Friday, May 29, 2015

Meet the Team!




Hey MFM Community!

There's a new market season AND a new team. Get to know the new MFM coordinators!


Co-coordinator: Matt McCormick
Matt is a U3 student from Winnipeg, Manitoba. He studies Economics and International Development with a focus on sustainable development and agriculture. He loves that the market connects the McGill community with local farmers and creates a community around sustainable food systems. His favourite part about being involved is seeing friends and familiar faces!






Co-coordinator: Shaina Agbayani
Shaina is McGill student in her last year in Equity Studies (ad-hoc program) and Political Science. She is a pinay born on unceded Mississauga of New Credit territory (also known as Toronto!). As a queer woman of colour, she is deeply interested / invested in how food justice is inextricably linked to anti-racist, feminist, anti-colonial, and anti-oppressive practice more broadly, and indigenous sovereignty. Get in touch with her if you wanna learn about making these links together! xo







Financial Coordinator: Renuka Giles
This year Renuka is the market's financial coordinator. Originally from Toronto she now studies Cognitive Science and Anthropology at McGill and loves food, dancing, and cooking. She's always around to answer any questions and would love to share ideas, recipes and other good stuff. 






Promotions & Outreach Coordinator: Olivia Wyllie
Olivia is a McGill Management Grad with a background in non-profit marketing and fundraising. She was attracted to the market because of how it connected McGill students and staff to local organic products in an urban setting. She's really excited to help promote MFM and meet new people in the McGill community.

Monday, January 12, 2015

We're Hiring!

The McGill Farmers’ Market is hiring!
Interested in helping to organize the 2015-2016 Farmers’ Market and CSA Program?

We're looking for passionate and committed members of the McGill community who want to help prepare next year's market! We are hiring for 4 coordinator positions: two (2) co-coordinators, one (1) promotions & outreach coordinator, and one (1) finance coordinator. All backgrounds and levels of involvement are welcome. Candidates must be available April 2015 - May 2016.

Please email your application to mcgillfarmersmarket {at} gmail {dot} com with subject line “Coordinator Call.” Include your CV, which position you are applying for, and a cover letter stating why you are the ideal candidate for this position. Stipends for all positions are $1250 for the year (May 2015 - May 2016). Deadline for applications is February 16th, 2015 by midnight. We will contact you for an interview. Coordinator training is in April 2015.

Farmers’ Market Co-Coordinator (2) – Stipend position
Responsibilities:
Must be available from April 2015 - late spring 2016.
Hold weekly to bi-weekly meetings with coordinator team, and meetings with stakeholders.
Oversee all necessary rentals, permits, strategies and grant applications.
Manage the coordination of the market, including space, vendors, and general market activities.
Manage the coordination of the CSA program, including space, vendors, and general procedures.
Provide support to the other coordinators.
Work with the finance coordinator to  continue MFM’s financial self-sustainment.
Work closely with the promotions coordinator to create an effective, comprehensive and environmentally-friendly promotional campaign.
Attend and assist CSA pick-up and farmers’ markets.
Provide support for general market activities.
Analyze and strategize about ways to improve market’s institutional structure, the CSA program, finances, and promotions.

Assets:
Bilingual (French & English)
Ability to work independently and as part of a team
Available during the summer of 2015 and into early summer 2016

Promotions and marketing coordinator (1) – Stipend position
Responsibilities:
1.     Must be available from April 2014- late spring 2015.
2.     Work with finance coordinator to create a comprehensive and environmentally friendly promotions & merchandise campaign.
3.     Advertisement for the fall market and the summer & fall CSA project. This includes:


Design tasks (posters, promotional packages, merchandise, etc)
Outreach to other student groups (first years, listservs, etc)
Outreach to wider community (businesses, potential vendors, faculty, etc)
4.     Maintain MFM social media outlets (website, fb, twitter, booking interviews)
5.     Attend and assist at CSA pick-up and farmers’ markets.
6.   Attend all coordinator team and stakeholders meetings.
7.     Provide support for general market activities, including market co-coordinator tasks.
8.    Responsible for volunteer coordination.  This includes:


Recruiting volunteers
Planning volunteer training
Creating and updating the volunteer schedule
Planning tasks for volunteers

Assets:
Experience working in promotions
Bilingual (French & English)
Excellent verbal and written communication skills
Comfortable promoting MFM among the McGill and downtown Montreal community, including student groups and local businesses and organizations
Experience in web design and other promotional media is an asset
Ability to work independently and as part of a team



Finance coordinator (1) – Stipend position

Responsibilities:
Must be available from April 2015- late spring 2016.
Manage finances and bank account for the farmers’ market and CSA project. This includes accounting and recording financial transactions.
Finalize 2015 budget and draft 2015-2016 budget in conjunction with other co-coordinators to ensure a financially sustainable market.
Work with promotions coordinator to create a comprehensive and environmentally-friendly promotional campaign.
Attend and assist CSA pick-up and farmers’ markets.
Provide support for general market activities.
Attend all coordinator meetings and stakeholder meetings.

Assets:
Experience working in finance
Excellent accounting skills
Comfortable working with marketing principles
Interested in organizational structure and strategy
Ability to work independently and as part of a team



Please email your application to mcgillfarmersmarket [at] gmail [dot] com with subject line “Coordinator Call.” Include your CV, which position you are applying for, and a cover letter stating why you are the ideal candidate for this position. Deadline for applications is February 16th, 2015 by midnight. We will contact you for an interview. Coordinator training is April 2015.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Ponzu-Glazed Winter Squash with Vegan Cilantro-Miso Dip

Post and recipe contributed by Katrina Kairys.

I must say that this is one of the most flavourful recipes I’ve ever created. I do credit South Asian cuisine with being the most fragrant and flavourful, but Japanese dishes are right up there with their heavenly mix of sweet and salty. Umami, that mysterious fifth taste (next to sweet, salty, bitter, and sour) finds its way into many Asian dishes and has a particular savory, but not exactly salty flavour. Now a little science lesson for you: glutamate, an amino acid in umami foods, acts on glutamate receptors on our tongues to trigger that burst of flavour.

Both the miso paste and ponzu have a strong umami flavour, and when paired together, the combo is indescribable. Seriously. You just have to try it for yourself. I used winter (delicata) squash because it's one of the few you have to peel, and being a student, time is of the essence. Just like with the daikon chips I made earlier this week, I avoided slathering the squash with oil and I used cooking spray instead in order for them to crisp up nicely.

The main ingredient for the dip, silken tofu, can be found in the cabinet of every vegan. This wonder food can be used to create non-dairy versions of everything from cream sauces and soups, to salad dressings and even smoothies. Plate the dip with the squash in whichever creative way you'd like and you have an umami party!

I realize that if my ingredients get any more particular, this is going to have to been sent to Gwenyth Paltrow’s goop.com to join her labour intensive ritzy recipes stocked with specialized ingredients. However, I’m not entirely to blame, as there are many specialty and international cuisine stores near the McGill campus, not to mention Montreal’s Chinatown which is a quick ten-minute walk away.

Ponzu-Glazed Ginger Winter Squash
Ingredients:
1 winter squash (delicata squash)
Canola oil cooking spray
1 tsp powdered ginger
2 tbsp ponzu

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 400F. Spray a foil-lined baking sheet with cooking spray.

2. Cut the ends off squash and then cut it lengthwise in half. Cut each half in half so it’s easier to handle. Then slice 1/2-inch pieces. 



3. Place squash slices on the baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes.

4. While squash is baking, combine ponzu and powdered ginger in a small bowl.
Note: If you don’t have ponzu, you can substitute it with the same amount of soya sauce and add 1 tbsp sugar, 1 tsp orange zest, and 1tsp lemon juice.



5. Remove the squash from the oven and flip the pieces over. Using a pastry brush, glaze the pieces with the ginger-ponzu glaze.

6. Bake for another 20 minutes until slices are crisp. (The ones the got a little extra glaze may burn slightly because of the sugar in the ponzu.)

Vegan Cilantro-Miso Dip
Ingredients:
1 cup silken (soft) tofu
2 tbsp chopped cilantro (plus some whole leaves for garnish)
1.5 tbsp miso paste

Directions:
1. Combine tofu, cilantro and miso paste in a blender and blend until smooth.



2. Put in a bowl and garnish with cilantro. Serve chilled.




"My interest in cooking began with a goal to eat healthy and use clean (and pronounceable) ingredients. After months of steamed veggies and chicken I got bored quickly. I started visiting Montreal's local markets and learned what a spice rack was. Montreal has turned me into foodie extraordinaire, and I now experiment with vegan, paleo, and gluten-free recipes that pack tons of flavour. Mind you, I'll add the occasional slice of butter or full-fat cheese to my recipes, but I'll warn you beforehand!" - Katrina

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Wasabi Daikon Chips

Post and recipe contributed by Katrina Kairys.


Daikon. Even if you claim you haven’t heard of it, I bet you’ve eaten it before. Ever poked at the curly white stuff on the edge of your sushi plate? Maybe grabbed a piece or two unsure if you were eating the garnish? It turns out that it’s good to eat and especially good for you! A hundred grams will give you 36% of the daily recommended intake of vitamin C. When eaten raw, it has a slight peppery taste but it’s much milder than horseradish. You can eat it in a slaw or toss it into a stir-fry.  During my (rather short) cooking career, I have managed to turn almost any vegetable into a chip: kale, zucchini, beets, sweet potato, squash and more. They’re great for when you’re craving something salty and crunchy. Thanks to veggie chips I can kiss Doritos goodbye!


Now for this recipe I don’t use any oil on the chips, just canola-based cooking spray. While some recipes call for a tablespoon or more of oil, I find that it makes the chips too soggy. Additionally, make sure you don’t salt the daikon beforehand. Ever study osmosis in grade school? As you probably know, salt draws out moisture so the daikon will shrink too much before you start cooking it. One twist I added to this recipe was wasabi powder. Typically the powder is used to make wasabi paste, another sushi staple. I sparingly sifted wasabi powder directly onto the chips to give them a hint of that wasabi “zing”. But fear not, these won’t leave you with a sniffling nose and watering eyes.

Wasabi Daikon Chips
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 30 minutes
Ingredients
2 daikon radishes (oriental radish/white radish)
1 tsp wasabi powder
1 tsp salt
pinch of pepper

Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 375 and lightly spray a baking sheet with cooking spray.
2. Thinly slice the daikon using a knife or mandolin.


3. Lay the daikon slices on a plate and using a fine sifter, sift the wasabi evenly over them. (Since I didn’t have a fine enough sifter, I used my tea-steeping spoon and it worked perfectly.)


4. Place the chips on the baking sheet and cook for 15 minutes.

5. Take out the tray and lightly salt and pepper the chips. Then flip them over and bake them for another 15 minutes. (Watch them carefully, as thinner or smaller pieces can burn quickly).


"My interest in cooking began with a goal to eat healthy and use clean (and pronounceable) ingredients. After months of steamed veggies and chicken I got bored quickly. I started visiting Montreal's local markets and learned what a spice rack was. Montreal has turned me into foodie extraordinaire, and I now experiment with vegan, paleo, and gluten-free recipes that pack tons of flavour. Mind you, I'll add the occasional slice of butter or full-fat cheese to my recipes, but I'll warn you beforehand!" - Katrina

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Golden Greek Salad

Post and recipe contributed by Katrina Kairys

This week at the McGill Farmers’ Market the stalls were filled with gourds and squashes in the spirit of the fall season. As cheesy as it sounds, for me, one of life’s little pleasures is buying my groceries in the crisp outdoors surrounded by the fall colours all while getting to step on a crunchy leaf or two. As I’m still struggling to let go of summer, I whipped up a refreshing, yet seasonally-coloured Greek salad this weekend. The very adorable lemon cucumbers sparked my idea for this dish. I had to ask the vendor what they were, as it was the first time I had ever seen them, and also the first time that I called an heirloom vegetable “cute”. They don’t taste lemon-y at all, and they are less bitter and slightly sweeter than green cucumbers. I decided to go Greek, and I picked up a red onion and golden Roma tomatoes from the Macdonald Campus Farm. 

This salad will give you healthy dose of carotenoids, folic acid, and calcium, along with the monounsaturated fats in the olive oil. If you’re struggling with that freshman fifteen, swap this for your next Caesar salad, and you won’t be disappointed. I do promise that an October-inspired recipe is to come, for there is only so much time before apple cider and pumpkin spice lattes are replaced with the gingerbread lattes of the holiday season.

Golden Greek Salad
Prep time: 10 minutes
Assembly time: 10 minutes

Ingredients:
2 golden yellow tomatoes
6 lemon cucumbers 
½ cup cubed feta cheese
6 pitted olives, sliced (add 3 whole olives for the garnish)
¼ finely chopped red onion
1 tsp dried oregano
1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
pepper to taste




Directions:

1. Coarsely chop the tomatoes and cucumbers and add them to a bowl with the olives and red onion. (It's fine to leave the skin on the cucumbers, as it doesn't have a strong taste and would be a pain to peel).


2. Add the feta cheese, oregano, and pepper to taste.

3. Drizzle with olive oil and garnish with whole olives.



"My interest in cooking began with a goal to eat healthy and use clean (and pronounceable) ingredients. After months of steamed veggies and chicken I got bored quickly. I started visiting Montreal's local markets and learned what a spice rack was. Montreal has turned me into foodie extraordinaire, and I now experiment with vegan, paleo, and gluten-free recipes that pack tons of flavour. Mind you, I'll add the occasional slice of butter or full-fat cheese to my recipes, but I'll warn you beforehand!" - Katrina

Sunday, October 5, 2014

Beet & Cucumber Raita

Post and recipe contributed by Katrina Kairys

Cumin found its way into another one of my dishes this week.  It's a staple ingredient in raita, a yogurt sauce popular in South Asia, which can be made a variety of different ways. There are tons of recipes using different mixes of spices, vegetables, and yogurts. In need of fresh veggies, I went to the Organic Campus stand and looked for cucumbers but couldn’t find any. Strange.  I asked the vendor and she pointed to a basket full of green veggies. I picked one up and it was easily big enough to feed a family of six. You’ll see in the photo below how this honker of a cucumber dwarfed a spoon. I decided to add beets to the raita to make it sweeter, but you can add other veggies like tomatoes or onions. The more veggies you add, the more of a side dish and less of a sauce it becomes. It's best eaten with spicy meat or tofu dishes as the coolness of the yogurt pairs nicely with the heat.


The monster cucumber from Organic Campus that inspired this dish.


Beet & Cucumber Raita
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Assembly Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients:
1.5 cups diced cucumber
1 cooked medium beet (approx. 1 cup diced)
1/2 cup 0% Greek yogurt
6-7 mint leaves, chopped
1 tb chopped dill
1 tsp cumin
pinch of salt

Directions:

1. Combine diced cucumber and beet in a large bowl.



2.  In a separate bowl combine yogurt, salt, cumin, chopped dill, and mint. Stir to combine ingredients.


3. Add yogurt mixture to the vegetables and stir to combine.


"My interest in cooking began with a goal to eat healthy and use clean (and pronounceable) ingredients. After months of steamed veggies and chicken I got bored quickly. I started visiting Montreal's local markets and learned what a spice rack was. Montreal has turned me into foodie extraordinaire, and I now experiment with vegan, paleo, and gluten-free recipes that pack tons of flavour. Mind you, I'll add the occasional slice of butter or full-fat cheese to my recipes, but I'll warn you beforehand!" - Katrina

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Sautéed Cumin Swiss Chard & Kale

Post and recipe contributed by Katrina Kairys
Cumin is a wonderful spice. It’s always a staple ingredient in my chili, but it can add a richly warm and spicy aroma to simple vegetable dishes. Cumin is a great source of iron which is needed to keep our immune systems up to par, especially now that – okay, I’ll say it – winter is coming. Use cumin to spice up vitamic-C packed kale and vitamin-K packed Swiss chard and you’ve got yourself an elixir in a bowl. Swiss chard comes in many colours and there was a rainbow of chard at the McGill Farmers’ Market this week – purple, green, and yellow – but it doesn’t matter which you use for the recipe. I find that Swiss chard and kale go together nicely, but you could also prepare spinach or collard greens with this mix of spices. This “veggie hash” as I call it can be eaten as a side, or as a main dish topped with tofu, chicken, or another source of protein. I did the opposite and used it to top my scrambled eggs. You get the point. It’s a versatile dish that’s worth trying out.

Sautéed Cumin Swiss Chard & Kale


Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 25 minutes
2 tbsp olive oil
2 cups coarsely chopped Swiss chard
1 cup coarsely chopped kale
½ cup diced white onion
1 tsp Cumin
1 tsp Chili powder
1 ½ tsp dried oregano
 pinch of salt

Directions:
1. Heat olive oil on medium heat and add chopped onion.

2. Cover and cook for 10 minutes until transluscent white.

3. Turn up to medium-high and add Swiss chard and kale. Cook uncovered for 15 minutes, stirring every few minutes.



4. Turn heat to low and add cumin, oregano, chili powder, and salt. Mix well.  


Sautéed Cumin Swiss Chard and Kale atop 
Sweet-Potato Scrambled Eggs


"My interest in cooking began with a goal to eat healthy and use clean (and pronounceable) ingredients. After months of steamed veggies and chicken I got bored quickly. I started visiting Montreal's local markets and learned what a spice rack was. Montreal has turned me into foodie extraordinaire, and I now experiment with vegan, paleo, and gluten-free recipes that pack tons of flavour. Mind you, I'll add the occasional slice of butter or full-fat cheese to my recipes, but I'll warn you beforehand!" - Katrina